Sunday, June 30, 2013

On Call, Vol. 1, No. 1 - Common Carrier: Take Me to TV Land!


From On Call: The Official Newsletter of the St. Elsewhere Appreciation Club, February 1997, volume 1, number 1.

Last summer, Nickelodeon launched a new channel for nostalgia buffs, called "TV LAND". TVL's line-up consists solely of vintage television shows and old commercials (new ads will be allowed beginning this fall).

When TVL premiered, St. Elsewhere appeared twice daily at 3:00pm and 11:00pm, with five episodes running back to back at the end of each week diring the wee hours of Sunday night, and a single episode on Saturday morning. In October of 1996 TVL realigned its schedule and moved SE to one showing per day at 7:00am.

By early November TVL had cycled through all 137 episodes and had begun a second run (which will end in May). A 4:00pm time slot was added, and at present we are back to our original "prescribed dosage" of twice daily.

And so, thanks to TV LAND we can watch St. Elsewhere seven days a week. Of course it would be nice if our friends at TV LAND would restore St. Elsewhere to its familiar (NBC) 10:00pm time slot, but we certainly don't want to look a gift channel in the mouth! Still, we will keep pushing for the change. Also, if you are currently unable to receive TV LAND, we strongly urge you to lobby with your local cable company.

If your requests fall on deaf ears, please e-mail SEAC, and give us the name of your cable company, and we will issue letters to them and to their corporate office. If all else fails, we suggest you purchase an 18-inch satellite dish from DSS which is now available for about $150 after rebates. The audio and video quality is far superior to cable, and you can receive hundres of channels. So don't feel you're at the mercy of your local cable operator - get TV LAND today and tune in to St. Elsewhere!

Originally produced by Longworth Communications. Note from editor: Just to be clear, this is from 1997, so this stuff no longer applies, and is presented here for the sake of historical preservation.

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